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Article One – Ronai, Carol and Ellis Caroline. 1989. “Turn-Ons for Money: Interactional Strategies of the table Dancer.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography (18)3: 271-298.

Research Questions

The article by Carol Ronai and Carolyn Ellis seeks to find out whether the go-go dancers go about their actions with the motive of making money, or whether some do it out of passion. The investigators also seek to identify whether the dancers have adequate knowledge on the merits and demerits of their actions.

Hypothesis

The investigators hypothesize that a majority of burlesques go about their actions with the motive of making economic income. The two also hypothesize that most of the table dancers lack enough education to give them the chance to serve in other stations.

Type of Study

Ronai and Ellis conduct a qualitative study to collect data that would suit the study. The investigators mostly depend on a source that interviews the study group, and who observes how go-go dancers go about their actions.

Method

The experimenters rely on the actions of a female author who engages in an ethnographic study to acquire first hand information on the actions of these dancers. The investigator who acquires first hand information engages in almost all the activities the dancers perform and this makes it easy to acquire a wide range of data.

Sample

The study incorporates one lady who disguises as a dancer but aspires to collect data.

Results

The researchers find that a majority of women who serve as table dancers go about their activities with the objective of making financial gains. The authors state that “In most male-female affairs, it is always okay for women to use sex to acquire financial gain” (295). The desire to earn some income drives the women to become extremely erotic while on stage considering that they have little to worry them. A majority of these women come from broken homes and consider the form of making money as the best way of fitting into the society. The study further shows that a large group of the women who dance for a living have little education that would not allow them to perform well in other professionals.

Interpretation of Results

The findings by the investigators show that lack of education and the society’s view people have on women as sex objects drive persons of the feminine gender to acts such as table dancing. The writers create the impression that there is need to empower women to protect them from becoming victims of sexual molestation.

Limitations

The primary limitation in the study is that the authors only collect data from one location (the Tampa Bay area of Florida). The study could yield better results if the investigators acquired data from a variety of stations.

Suggestions for Future Research

The authors need to conduct a future study that would identify whether women find the profession to be more attractive as time pass, or whether women find alternative forms of earning a living. The researchers should also conduct a study to understand the age group that is largely attracted by the act.

Discussion Questions

  1. Discuss why the investigators choose the ethnographic method.
  2. Discuss the ethics of table dancing and describe whether it is morally right or wrong

Article Two – Hunt, Jennifer and Manning, Peter. 1991. “The Social Context of Police Lying.” Symbolic Interaction (14)1: 51-70.

Research Questions

Hunt and Manning aspire to identify the reasons that make the police to lie. The surveyors further seek to identify the effects of the increasing cases of lying in the police force.

Hypothesis

The two hypothesize that the police tell lies to cover specific stories and individuals, and that the lies may reduce the trust the public has on the police.

Type of Study

The investigators conduct a qualitative study to acquire data that would suit their study. The data collector in this case intermingles with the police to recognize the lies they make and to understand the factors that drive them to tell lies.

Method

The data collector receives funding to study police behavior while undergoing training at a Metropolitan police department. The surveyor utilizes observation, interviews, tape-recording, and joint participation of activities to acquire data.

Sample

One senior author takes charge of collecting data among many officers.

Results

The investigators find that the major motive the police have in telling lies is to protect the interest of some culprit or theirs. Furthermore, the investigators find that the use of lies in the police force create a bad image for the law enforcers, and may harm the relationship between members of the public and the police.

Interpretation of Results

The findings mean that the lies among the police would go down when the police receive better education on the need to tell the truth. The results also give the impression that the members of the public would not want to interact with police officers who do not tell the truth.

Limitation

The major limitation in the article is that the authors use long paragraphs that may be quite difficult to understand, particularly when learners at lower stages use the article.

Suggestions for Future Research

The authors should carry out investigations to identify the internal factors within the workplace that drive the police to cheat. The surveyors should also conduct a future study that would identify more effective in dealing with cheating cases.

Discussion Questions

  1. Identify ways of lowering cases of insincerity in the police force.
  2. Are the police justified to tell lies?

Article Three – Adler, Patricia and Adler, Peter. 1988. “Intense Loyalty in Organizations: A Case Study of College Athletics.” Administrative Science Quarterly, (33), 401-417.

Research Questions

The authors aim at finding the type of loyalty that would better relations within an organization. The researchers also intent to recognize the factors that builds the bond among athletes.

Hypothesis

The authors hypothesize that organizational intense loyalty has a major impact in building connection and that regular meetings and trust enhance loyalty among athletes.

Type of Study

The surveyors employ the qualitative methodology with the perception that it is easy to implement. The researchers in this instance intermingle with the study group to retrieve information.

Method

The researchers collect data over a period of 5 years (1980-1985) where they observe and interview the study group with regard to creating loyalty.

Sample

The research studies a group of basketball players in a medical school.

Results

The investigators find that the organizational loyalty bond foster good relations more effectively when compared to the common forms of bonding many organizations adopt in the current times. The study reveals that cooperation and trust serve as critical components to attain loyalty.

Interpretation of Results

Limitations

The limitation in the article is that the authors do not use graphical presentations to summarize some of the issues such as the five elements necessary for the creation of organizational loyalty.

Suggestions for Future Research

The investigators should identify better means of building loyalty within organizations. The surveyors should also conduct studies to find out the possible hardships firms may face in their quest to build loyalty.

Discussion Questions

  1. What internal factors determine loyalty in an organization?
  2. What are the major benefits of organizational loyalty?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Adler, Patricia and Adler, Peter. 1988. “Intense Loyalty in Organizations: A Case Study of College Athletics.” Administrative Science Quarterly (33), 401-417.

Hunt, Jennifer and Manning, Peter. 1991. “The Social Context of Police Lying.” Symbolic Interaction (14)1: 51-70.

Ronai, Carol and Ellis Caroline. 1989. “Turn-Ons for Money: Interactional Strategies of the table Dancer.” Journal of Contemporary Ethnography (18)3: 271-298.

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